Should women pay more for health care?

Her complaints are familiar: The Affordable Care Act enacted pricing rules that largely prohibited charging women higher health-insurance premiums than men, and the Republican plan would relax some of those restrictions, which probably would result in women’s paying higher premiums.

But nowhere in the piece does she consider the actual facts of the case: Women have radically higher lifetime medical expenses than men do, about one-third higher, on average.

(At the risk of committing hate crime, I’ll be using “women” in the old-fashioned sense, the way Bill Nye used to before the Minitrue men at Netflix memory-holed all that chromosome talk.)

According to “The Lifetime Distribution of Health Care Costs,” (published in Health Services Research and made available online by the National Institutes of Health) per-capita lifetime health-care expenditures for women run $361,200, or nearly $100,000 more than per-capita lifetime health-care expenditures for men. Part of that is related to the fact that women live longer on average, but that does not account for the majority of the difference. If you want to call yourselves “reality-based,” how about taking a little reality into account? You don’t necessarily have to interpret the facts in any particular way, but you ought at least to take note of them.

Controversial, for sure, but through provoking. The rest is here.

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